Monday, January 30, 2017

The pressure on Zia to hang Bhutto — view from the US

DAWN.COM — UPDATED Jan 26, 2017 10:06am
The following is an excerpt from a declassified document released online by America’s Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) as part of a searchable database on its website Reading Room. Declassified documents were previously only available to the public at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland.
document titled “National Intelligence Daily Cable”dated October 1978 contains an excerpt on the pressure on then president Zia-ul-Haq’s from the military establishment.
The cable, written “for the purpose of informing US officials only”, contains brief assessments on several countries including Syria, Iraq, Lebanon, Brazil and Pakistan.
It reads: "Ultimately, Zia's ability to stay in office depends on the continued support of the military. Zia's inability to solve Pakistan's economic and political problems, his assumption of the presidency, his efforts to downgrade potential rivals in the army, and the belief that martial law is damaging both the reputation and the military capability of the army have all contributed to growing unhappiness among senior officers."

"So far however, military officers do not appear to be planning to move against him in office till he decides Bhutto's fate"
Another assessment report compiled by US officials dated February 1979 also reflects on Zia’s decision regarding Bhutto’s trial.
It reads: "If Bhutto is spared, the army leadership will be reinforced in its unhappiness with Zia and more inclined to move against him"
The abovementioned document is part of a database of 930,000 previously-confidential files released by the CIA on January 17, 2017. The CIA had disseminated historical declassified documents to its CIA Records Search Tool (CREST) since 1999.
To view Dawn.com's compilation of extracts from the declassified CIA documents, click here.
https://www.dawn.com/news/1309819/the-pressure-on-zia-to-hang-bhutto-view-from-the-us

Wednesday, November 2, 2016



Now the truth emerges: how the US fuelled the rise of Isis in Syria and Iraq

Now the truth emerges: how the US fuelled the rise of Isis in Syria and Iraq
Seumas Milne

The war on terror, that campaign without end launched 14 years ago by George Bush, is tying itself up in ever more grotesque contortions. On Monday the trial in London of a Swedish man, Bherlin Gildo, accused of terrorism in Syria, collapsed after it became clear British intelligence had been arming the same rebel groups the defendant was charged with supporting.

The prosecution abandoned the case, apparently to avoid embarrassing the intelligence services. The defence argued that going ahead with the trial would have been an “affront to justice” when there was plenty of evidence the British state was itself providing “extensive support” to the armed Syrian opposition.

That didn’t only include the “non-lethal assistance” boasted of by the government (including body armour and military vehicles), but training, logistical support and the secret supply of “arms on a massive scale”. Reports were cited that MI6 had cooperated with the CIA on a “rat line” of arms transfers from Libyan stockpiles to the Syrian rebels in 2012 after the fall of the Gaddafi regime.

Clearly, the absurdity of sending someone to prison for doing what ministers and their security officials were up to themselves became too much. But it’s only the latest of a string of such cases. Less fortunate was a London cab driver Anis Sardar, who was given a life sentence a fortnight earlier for taking part in 2007 in resistance to the occupation of Iraq by US and British forces. Armed opposition to illegal invasion and occupation clearly doesn’t constitute terrorism or murder on most definitions, including the Geneva convention.

But terrorism is now squarely in the eye of the beholder. And nowhere is that more so than in the Middle East, where today’s terrorists are tomorrow’s fighters against tyranny – and allies are enemies – often at the bewildering whim of a western policymaker’s conference call.

For the past year, US, British and other western forces have been back in Iraq, supposedly in the cause of destroying the hyper-sectarian terror group Islamic State (formerly known as al-Qaida in Iraq). This was after Isis overran huge chunks of Iraqi and Syrian territory and proclaimed a self-styled Islamic caliphate.

The campaign isn’t going well. Last month, Isis rolled into the Iraqi city of Ramadi, while on the other side of the now nonexistent border its forces conquered the Syrian town of Palmyra. Al-Qaida’s official franchise, the Nusra Front, has also been making gains in Syria.

Some Iraqis complain that the US sat on its hands while all this was going on. The Americans insist they are trying to avoid civilian casualties, and claim significant successes. Privately, officials say they don’t want to be seen hammering Sunni strongholds in a sectarian war and risk upsetting their Sunni allies in the Gulf.

A revealing light on how we got here has now been shone by a recently declassified secret US intelligence report, written in August 2012, which uncannily predicts – and effectively welcomes – the prospect of a “Salafist principality” in eastern Syria and an al-Qaida-controlled Islamic state in Syria and Iraq. In stark contrast to western claims at the time, the Defense Intelligence Agency document identifies al-Qaida in Iraq (which became Isis) and fellow Salafists as the “major forces driving the insurgency in Syria” – and states that “western countries, the Gulf states and Turkey” were supporting the opposition’s efforts to take control of eastern Syria.

Raising the “possibility of establishing a declared or undeclared Salafist principality”, the Pentagon report goes on, “this is exactly what the supporting powers to the opposition want, in order to isolate the Syrian regime, which is considered the strategic depth of the Shia expansion (Iraq and Iran)”.

Which is pretty well exactly what happened two years later. The report isn’t a policy document. It’s heavily redacted and there are ambiguities in the language. But the implications are clear enough. A year into the Syrian rebellion, the US and its allies weren’t only supporting and arming an opposition they knew to be dominated by extreme sectarian groups; they were prepared to countenance the creation of some sort of “Islamic state” – despite the “grave danger” to Iraq’s unity – as a Sunni buffer to weaken Syria.

That doesn’t mean the US created Isis, of course, though some of its Gulf allies certainly played a role in it – as the US vice-president, Joe Biden, acknowledged last year. But there was no al-Qaida in Iraq until the US and Britain invaded. And the US has certainly exploited the existence of Isis against other forces in the region as part of a wider drive to maintain western control.

The calculus changed when Isis started beheading westerners and posting atrocities online, and the Gulf states are now backing other groups in the Syrian war, such as the Nusra Front. But this US and western habit of playing with jihadi groups, which then come back to bite them, goes back at least to the 1980s war against the Soviet Union in Afghanistan, which fostered the original al-Qaida under CIA tutelage.

It was recalibrated during the occupation of Iraq, when US forces led by General Petraeus sponsored an El Salvador-style dirty war of sectarian death squads to weaken the Iraqi resistance. And it was reprised in 2011 in the Nato-orchestrated war in Libya, where Isis last week took control of Gaddafi’s home town of Sirte.

In reality, US and western policy in the conflagration that is now the Middle East is in the classic mould of imperial divide-and-rule. American forces bomb one set of rebels while backing another in Syria, and mount what are effectively joint military operations with Iran against Isis in Iraq while supporting Saudi Arabia’s military campaign against Iranian-backed Houthi forces in Yemen. However confused US policy may often be, a weak, partitioned Iraq and Syria fit such an approach perfectly.

What’s clear is that Isis and its monstrosities won’t be defeated by the same powers that brought it to Iraq and Syria in the first place, or whose open and covert war-making has fostered it in the years since. Endless western military interventions in the Middle East have brought only destruction and division. It’s the people of the region who can cure this disease – not those who incubated the virus.




Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Misleading low crime rate



Low crime rate doesn't always mean less crime!!
Some times it simply means crime committed but not detected.

Thursday, March 31, 2016

My brief story



I wrote about Human rights issues in Pakistan. Pakistan ISI wanted to kill us.
We fled Pakistan to Sri Lanka. We were traced in Sri Lanka by Pak agencies.
On the request of Pakistan ISI we were kept in detention for a month in Sri Lanka. Our passports were confiscated.
We fled detention and started living in hiding. I used black berry phone to avoid being traced. I kept fighting for my right to live.
UNHCR local Sri Lankan staff secretly stood by their Govt.
Sri Lankan Govt refused to allow us to leave the country
We lived in disguise. I wore face cover and my 12 year old sister lived as a boy to avoid being recognized and caught.




                                              My sister in disguise in Sri Lanka
                                                                          
                                                 My sister in Keena Hotel Nuwara Eliya in Sri Lanka.

My sister now suffers from PTSD in Canada

We remained in hiding while Special Forces were looking for us.
My mother lived separately from us to be in touch with UNHCR.

I kept writing on my blog and social media sites to get help.
I cut myself and posted the video on YouTube to be helped.
UNHCR newly arrived RSD Officer Ilija Todorovic came to know about our buried case by my cutting video.

He immediately contacted me by email and started helping us.
Soon he was transferred, He handed over our case to Joseph Carroll. He was honest and brave and stood by us in very difficult times.
Before leaving Sri Lanka, Ilija Todorovic assigned our case on emergency. Emergency case requires immediate resettlement by the resettlement country.
Canadian immigration officer who was in Sri Lanka for a long time, was taking very long to help us.
I sent a Fax to Canadian Govt written in French. (By google translator) I asked for immediate protection as was required in our urgent case. I avoided writing in English because of the fear of Fax office.
On 8th January 2015, Pakistan friendly Sri Lankan Govt fell after an election.
 The new Sri Lankan Govt had nothing against us.
My honest resettlement officer informed me about the arrival of new immigration officer in Canadian embassy.
The new officer immediately started working on our case. He made sure that we leave Sri Lanka as soon as possible.

We landed in our new beautiful country on March 5, 2015.

Friday, May 22, 2015

Who killed Sabeen Mahmud


Sabeen Mahmud with her mother

 Sabeen Mahmud, a prominent Pakistani social and human rights activist, was shot dead, shortly after hosting an event on Balochistan’s "disappeared people", in Karachi. On friday  April 25, 2015.
Mahmud, 40, was the director of T2F [The Second Floor], a cafĂ© and arts space that has been a mainstay of Karachi’s activists since 2007. She was one of the country’s most outspoken human rights advocates. She was shot four times from close range.

Human Rights Commission of Pakistan's Chairperson Zohra Yusuf said,
"It appears that an attempt is being made to silence human rights activists  or those who take up the causes of the people,"
Sabeen had reportedly told her colleagues that she was being scrutinized by the Pakistani intelligence agency, The New York Times reported. 
"The Baluchistan problem is so huge, and Pakistani intelligence agencies are so paranoid, that they will not allow even discussion in a room full of people, let alone a tv chanel or a newspaper.
Sabeen was known for organizing the first hackathon in Pakistan, in 2013,
a space for dialogue on social issues. 

                                Rest in peace

She often discussed the military's human rights abuses in the region and questioned the disappearance of activists. 
Sabeen had famously told a magazine in an interview that "Fear is just a line in your head. You can choose what side of that line you want to be on".
She had been receiving indirect threats.

Now after her death it is likely that Pakistani authorities will soon arrest some so called terrorists who will confess killing her because of religious motives. The question is who is supporting terrorists in Pakistan? 

Sunday, January 18, 2015

Lawyer Lakshan Dias informed UNHCR that Sadia Khan"s life is in danger


Pakistani Christian woman threatened by 2 states protected by none.

  
Sri Lankan most famous lawyer Lakshan Dias confirmed to UNHCR that Sadia Khan is wanted by 2 states.



I am Sadia Khan, a Pakistani Christian. I wrote about Pakistan intelligence agency (ISI) & became a target of 2 friendly States Pakistan and Sri Lanka. I fled Pakistan with my little sister & mother to save our life and got trapped by Sri Lankan intelligence (SIS)

Sri Lankan authorities took our passports & all we had. We were illegally detained and were about to be deported on the request of Pakistan ISI when we fled from the detention.

For the last 2 long years we live in hiding and bleed every day.  

Though its crystal clear that 2 States want to take our life none has protected us so far. While Sri Lankan authorities are looking for us we continue to live in fear.

Here are the main points. It is very clear that Pakistan is chasing me in Sri Lanka.

(1)  When I wrote by the name of Khizra I was followed on the internet which continues to date.

As soon as I got exposed, Sri Lankan authorities took us to the detention.



(2)  An officer who was the part of special CID team, shouted at me, "You give our information to India." Another said "why did you do that, you don't know your country."



(3) Officers in the detention camp told us clearly.

"Your case is between ISI and SIS. ISI Head contacted SIS Head to investigate about you. Special investigation team is investigating about you. You will be taken to the court and deported."



(4)    Two very well educated Pakistani men came to the detention camp at different occasions and collected information about us from the other detainees.



(5)  When I had a minor heart attack, a Doctor in the Hospital told me that Sri Lankan authorities have    informed the Hospital Management that I am a spy. 

(6)  I was guarded by armed police men and women in uniform in the hospital.



(7)   My mother was not allowed to visit me.



(8)  I called my church Brother from the hospital and asked him to help me. He said "police came to my house to investigate about you. They have declared you a criminal and its a crime to help criminals. You don’t even know what you are being charged with"



(9)  When I was discharged from the hospital, 2 police officers took me to a horrible looking jail, they talked about me and my name was enlisted there.



(10)  In the detention camp I discussed all this with a very kind immigration officer He said with lot of worry "I am also listening to this Spy Spy thing"



(11)  In October 2013 I called immigration Department of Sri Lanka. I spoke to the Deputy Controller General of immigration. I asked him if I get married to a foreigner and want to leave your country will you return my passport? 

He said no why did you come here?.



(12)  I spoke to another immigration officer Assistant Controller Bandara and asked for help. In the guise of a friend he told me, Special forces are looking for you, I will secretly return your passports. Run to India. Leave this place this call must be getting traced.



(13)  Easwaran a Christian Sri Lankan journalist promised me that he will take me out from this trouble. After speaking to  Sri  Lankan foreign Ministry sounded very worried and wrote to me that he cannot afford to support me anymore.



(14)  After the publication of my appeal http://colombogazette.com/2013/04/07/pakistani-blogger-appeals-to-mr/  to the president in the newspaper, I was positive and thought its over. I called the same officer who was very kind to me and asked him If I could move freely. He said 

"Hide hide Special Forces are looking for you." He also told me that according to the authorities I was recently spotted in Jafana. (I have never been there) He was also very worried that my call will be traced to him.



(15)  Mr Tatari an Afghan detainee told my mother on phone that immigration officers have asked him about me( Sadia) several times. They are getting more and more aggressive and want to know my location. They are accusing him that it was him who told me how to get out from the detention camp.



(16)  During my efforts to save my life I called Pakistan High Commission several times.   They tried to trace my calls and  tried  to convince me to pay a visit to them (to be arrested) Deputy High Commissioner Amna Baloch who actually wanted to help me told me that she had no access to my file in the embassy. It was horrible to know that I had a file in Pakistan high Commission Sri Lanka.



(17)  Recently I called Sri Lankan Immigration and once again requested them to return our passports so that we can move about freely before our resettlement to a safe country. They kept insisting that I should pay them a visit. 



UNHCR requested Sri Lankan Govt & Immigration department to return our passports. They did not comply & keep holding our passports.





Last but not the least,

During our detention Lakshan Dias the most famous Sri Lankan lawyer ,Chairman of SANRIM, who has currently challenged court decision about the deportation of Asylum seekers in Supreme court wrote to UNHCR confirming that he has 1st hand knowledge  that I am targeted by Pakistan friendly Sri Lankan SIS to fulfill the request of Pakistan ISI. I am putting the snapshot of his email below.
2 long years have passed. Though we have a huge threat to our life yet we  are not saved by any other state.







Thursday, December 18, 2014

Survivor Child says, Terrorists spoke Arabic

This child who survived the brutal attack on Peshawar Army Public School says the terrorists who killed had long beards & spoke Arabic.


Peshawar Attack: Army Public School flooded with blood of innocent children

Originally posted by daily mail. 

Dead children piled up in their classroom 

The first devastating images emerged today of the blood-soaked classrooms where 141 innocent children and 10 teachers were massacred by the Taliban.
Horrifying pictures revealed the carnage wrought by seven extremist gunmen who sprayed children with bullets as they sat receiving first aid tuition and exploded suicide bombs in a room of 60 pupils. 
As the Pakistani city of Peshawar began the harrowing process of conducting mass funerals, the family of a teacher torched alive in front of her class gathered to say funeral prayers. 
Tahira Kazi, the principal of the Army Public School and College in Peshawar, was set on fire by jihadists who slaughtered so many.
It is believed she was targeted because she is married to a retired army colonel, Kazi Zafrullah. The picture obtained by MailOnline shows her standing proudly next to a student believed to be her son.
Today the Pakistani prime minister lifted a moratorium on the death penalty, as the school reopened to reveal the terrifying aftermath of the atrocity, including Mrs Kazi's office, where a terrorist blew himself up.
Scroll down for videos

A blood-soaked book lies abandoned and trodden on the floor of the school following Tuesday's attack
A blood-soaked book lies abandoned and trodden on the floor of the school following Tuesday's attack
Shoes lie among blood on the auditorium floor, where pupils were having a First Aid lecture before the massacre unfolded
Pictures of a blood splattered doorway leading to an auditorium and the scene of the final gun battle also emerged.
In a grim tour of the building photographers were shown inside the auditorium. 
The floor is caked in blood in places and dozens of chairs lie in disarray, knocked over by children running for cover as the terrorists hosed them with bullets.
The lucky ones, it transpired, survived by playing dead under these chairs as the gunmen stalked the room, searching for children they'd missed.

As people around the world united to condemn the attack, the Taliban gloatingly published pictures of the fighters responsible for the slaughter. 
A series of chilling images shows them lined up with assault rifles and rocket launchers. 
The massacre led to calls for the death penalty to be restored. 'It was decided that this moratorium should be lifted. The prime minister approved,' said government spokesman Mohiuddin Wan, referring to Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's approval of the decision by a ministerial committee. 
A moratorium on the death penalty was imposed in 2008 and only one execution has taken place since then. 
Tahira Kazi (left), the principal of the Army Public School and College in Peshawar, was set on fire by jihadists who slaughtered 142 people, most of them children
Tahira Kazi (left), the principal of the Army Public School and College in Peshawar, was set on fire by jihadists who slaughtered 142 people, most of them children
It is believed Mrs Kazi (right) was targeted because she's married to a retired army colonel, Kazi Javaid
It is believed Mrs Kazi (right) was targeted because she's married to a retired army colonel, Kazi Javaid
The government declared a three-day mourning period, starting on Wednesday. The authorities also warned schools to be vigilant, as intelligence has been received by police suggesting terrorists are planning to attach magnetic bombs to school buses, according to Sky News.
Some of the funerals were held overnight, but most of the 132 children and 10 school staff members killed in the attack were to be buried Wednesday. Another 121 students and three staff members were wounded.
Some of the critically wounded adults - members of the school staff - died overnight, and authorities raised the overall death toll to 148. 
Hundreds of people attended the funeral prayer for Mrs Kazi, held in a field of wheat crops. 
Her son Ahmedullah, 23, said that he was proud of his mother.  
'She was more committed to the students of the school than her family,' he said.
Ahmedullah said that he last met her on Tuesday morning, for breakfast, the day she was killed and burnt alive.
He told MailOnline: 'Her vehicle came late that day, so we talked about different things. She was so happy for her students. She told me that she would have a busy day ahead. She left home for school around 8:45 am.'
At around 10:45 he heard about the attack and tried to call her.
He continued: 'I started trying her cell number but for an hour it remained busy. I tried dozens of the time but couldn't reach her and after an hour her cell turned off. Later her personal assistant (PA) told me that she was busy talking to parents of the students. Her PA told us that she had the opportunity to leave the school.'
Her elder brother Kazi Karimullah, 67, who is a banker by profession, said that she was a passionate, dedicated and committed person. 
Hundreds of people attended the funeral prayer for Mrs Kazi, held in a field of wheat crops
Hundreds of people attended the funeral prayer for Mrs Kazi, held in a field of wheat crops
Mrs Kazi's body is moved to the grave at her funeral, which took place today
Mrs Kazi's body is moved to the grave at her funeral, which took place today
Mourning: Mrs Kazi's body is carried by relatives at her funeral today
Mourning: Mrs Kazi's body is carried by relatives at her funeral today
Mrs Kazi's son, Ahmedullah (centre), said that he was proud of his mother. Pictured are friends and relatives at her funeral
Mrs Kazi's son, Ahmedullah (centre), said that he was proud of his mother. Pictured are friends and relatives at her funeral
Mrs Kazi's elder brother Kazi Karimullah (pictured) said that she was a passionate, dedicated and committed person
Mrs Kazi's elder brother Kazi Karimullah (pictured) said that she was a passionate, dedicated and committed person
Mother-of-three Tahira Kazi was well loved by students, family and friends, with hundreds attending her funeral
Mother-of-three Tahira Kazi was well loved by students, family and friends, with hundreds attending her funeral
He said: 'We were more friends than siblings. She was very sweet person. She was very close to me. We used to meet almost everyday. This is true that she used to give school more time than her home.
'She had that smiling face. But I could not see her face for more than a second after she was killed. It was so horrible. It was burnt and I could not even imagine my sister in that shape. I could not dare see her body more than once.'
Mother of three Tahira Kazi was very popular among her students, too.
'She was not an angry principal but a very disciplined one,' said 18-year-old grade 12 APS student Muhammad Tajdar. 'I have never saw her hitting a student or in an angry mood. She came to our class last time on Thursday last week and asked us to focus on our studies.' 
Tajdar was there when terrorists attacked the school. 
Ehsan Elahi, 13, has revealed the horror he witnessed in the auditorium
Ehsan Elahi, 13, has revealed the horror he witnessed in the auditorium
He said: 'I was on second floor of building with my class fellow when I heard firing. I saw three young men clad in black uniform jumping the back wall of the school. They were carrying guns and hand grenades. They started firing the bullets straight to the students. We quickly got into a classroom, locked the door and put chairs and benches in front of the door. 
'There were at least 25 students in that classroom. We heard the cries of the students and teachers but we stayed silent. We were shivering with fear.'
Another shocking account of the massacre came from 13-year-old survivor Ehsan Elahi, an eighth grade student who was busy with his classmates learning first aid training from army instructors at the main hall of the school when he heard the sound of gunfire nearby.
He told MailOnline: 'Our teachers and instructors asked us to calm down but the sound of the bullets started came closer and closer. In the next minute, the glass of windows and doors of the hall smashed with bullets. Some people started kicking the hall doors.'
He said that situation created panic among the 100 students in the hall. 
He said: 'Everybody was trying to find a place to hide but there was not such places in the hall. The students were crying and weeping. There were only chairs and benches to hide behind in the hall. I jumped behind a bench and laid on the ground.' He said the attackers burst in and started 'spraying bullets like hell'.
The school has been left wrecked and desolate by the horrific gun and grenade rampage 
The school has been left wrecked and desolate by the horrific gun and grenade rampage 
Huge bullet holes are seen across the wall of a classroom in the school in Peshawar. It took nine hours of fighting to kill the fanatics
Huge bullet holes are seen across the wall of a classroom in the school in Peshawar. It took nine hours of fighting to kill the fanatics
The markings reflected the horror that went on inside the school's walls during Tuesday's massacre
The markings reflected the horror that went on inside the school's walls during Tuesday's massacre
Gruesome: Some of the walls in the school are caked in blood - a chilling legacy of the massacre 
Gruesome: Some of the walls in the school are caked in blood - a chilling legacy of the massacre 
Blood traces are seen in the debris of a part of the conference hall inside the army-run school
Blood traces are seen in the debris of a part of the conference hall inside the army-run school
The attack, which started around 10am yesterday, left 148 dead - 132 of them children
The attack, which started around 10am yesterday, left 148 dead - 132 of them children
Chairs were turned over, as bullet holes adorned the walls in one of the rooms at the school 
Chairs were turned over, as bullet holes adorned the walls in one of the rooms at the school 
The bullet holes had shattered the plaster around most of the school, reflecting the sheer horror which happened during the attack
The bullet holes had shattered the plaster around most of the school, reflecting the sheer horror which happened during the attack
Elahi continued: 'I saw army instructors falling on the ground first. I saw many of my friends getting bullets on their heads, chests, arms and legs right in front of me. Their body parts and blood were flying like small pieces of cotton in the class room. 
'Warm blood and flesh of my friends fell on my face and other parts of my body. It was horrible. They kept on firing bullets for at least 10 minutes and then stopped. It was a pause of a maximum of a minute. Next moment, they started spraying bullets again towards those who were crying with pain or moving. I also received two bullets on my right arm. I wanted to cry with my full voice but I held my pain and did not cry because it meant death.'
Elahi explained how his life was eventually saved by Pakistani soldiers.
He said: 'They were not ready to leave alive even a single person present in the hall. After around 15 minutes, we heard some bullets shots from outside. I think army soldiers reached the school by that time and they fired those bullets. This diverted the attention of the attackers. They ran out from the hall. But, I did not move or cried for next 10 minutes unless army men came to rescue us. 
'The hall has turned to pool of blood and death. Human blood, flesh and body parts were scattered everywhere. I saw lifeless faces of many of my friends when I was leaving the hall. Their faces are still in front of my eyes.'   
Images of the aftermath of the attack reveal something of its horror, with some parts of the school completely ruined 
Images of the aftermath of the attack reveal something of its horror, with some parts of the school completely ruined 
Children ran for their lives during the attack, leaving overturned desks behind them 
Children ran for their lives during the attack, leaving overturned desks behind them 
Tragic scene: Pakistani journalists film and photograph inside an auditorium of the Army Public School
Tragic scene: Pakistani journalists film and photograph inside an auditorium of the Army Public School
Chairs are upturned and blood stains the floor at the Army Public School auditorium
Chairs are upturned and blood stains the floor at the Army Public School auditorium
Survivor Ehsan Elahi told how gunmen burst into the auditorium and fired at children for a full 10 minutes 

More horrifying accounts have emerged of another female teacher being burned alive as she courageously stood in the path of the terrorists and told her children to run for their lives.
Afsha Ahmed, 24, confronted the marauding gunmen when they burst into her classroom and told them: 'You can only kill my students over my dead body.'
The militants doused her with petrol and set her alight, but she still mustered the strength to beckon her pupils to flee.
Hifsa Khush is thought to have been burned alive in front of her pupils after being doused in petrol.
Hifsa Khush is thought to have been burned alive in front of her pupils after being doused in petrol.
One of her students, 15-year-old Irfan Ullah, wept as he recalled her incredible bravery.
He said: 'She was a hero, so brave.
'She jumped up and stood between us and the terrorists before they could target us.
'She warned them: 'You can only kill them over my dead body'. I remember her last words - she said: 'I won't see my students lying in blood on the floor'.'
Irfan, who suffered serious injuries to his chest and stomach in the chaos, said he hoped Mrs Ahmed would forgive him for not trying to protect her and for any mistakes he ever made in class.
'I felt so selfish as we ran away to safe our lives instead of trying to save our teacher who sacrificed her life for our better tomorrow,' he added.
Another teacher, Hifsa Khush, is also thought to have been burned alive in front of her pupils after being doused in petrol. 
Prayer vigils were held across the nation and in other schools, students spoke of their shock at the carnage in Peshawar, where seven Taliban gunmen, explosives strapped to their bodies, scaled a back wall using a ladder to get into the military-run establishment in the morning hours on Tuesday.

REVEALED: THE BLOODTHIRSTY TALIBAN LEADER DUBBED 'RADIO MULLAH' BEHIND PAKISTANI SCHOOL MASSACRE - WHO ALSO ORDERED MALALA HIT


A school noticeboard stands amid debris and pock-marked walls
A school noticeboard stands amid debris and pock-marked walls
Haunting: A broken window of a classroom at the Army Public School

Tragic: Dawood Ibrahim is the only member of class 9 left. He didn't go to school on the morning of the attack because his alarm didn't go off
Tragic: Dawood Ibrahim is the only member of class 9 left. He didn't go to school on the morning of the attack because his alarm didn't go off
Indian Muslim children pray at a madrasa, or religious school, for Tuesday's Taliban attack victims in Ahmadabad
Indian Muslim children pray at a madrasa, or religious school, for Tuesday's Taliban attack victims in Ahmadabad
People attend the funeral of a student killed in Tuesday's Taliban attack in Peshawar
People attend the funeral of a student killed in Tuesday's Taliban attack in Peshawar
Pakistani mourners carry the coffin of a teacher killed in the masscre during his funeral
Pakistani mourners carry the coffin of a teacher killed in the masscre during his funeral
Mourners and relatives of Pakistani teacher Saeed Khan, a victim of a Taliban attack in a school, pray around his body in Peshawar
Mourners and relatives of Pakistani teacher Saeed Khan, a victim of a Taliban attack in a school, pray around his body in Peshawar
The attack was the deadliest slaughter of innocents in the country and horrified a nation already weary of unending terrorist assaults. 
Army commandos fought the Taliban in a day-long battle until the school was cleared and the attackers dead. 
'They finished in minutes what I had lived my whole life for, my son,' said laborer Akhtar Hussain, tears streaming down his face as he buried his 14-year-old, Fahad. He said he had worked for years in Dubai to earn a livelihood for his children.
'That innocent one is now gone in the grave, and I can't wait to join him, I can't live anymore,' he wailed, banging his fists against his head.
'The attackers came around 10:30 a.m. on a pick-up van,' said Issam Uddin, a 25-year-old school bus driver.
'They drove it around the back of the school and set it on fire to block the way. Then they went to Gate 1 and killed a soldier, a gatekeeper and a gardener. Firing began and the first suicide attack took place.'
The Taliban said the attack was revenge for a military offensive against their safe havens in the northwest, along the border with Afghanistan, which began in June. Analysts said the school siege showed that even diminished, the militant group still could inflict horrific carnage.
Pakistani health workers treat a student at a hospital a day after the atrocity
Pakistani health workers treat a student at a hospital a day after the atrocity
Over a hundred students were wounded in the rampage by Taliban gunmen 
Over a hundred students were wounded in the rampage by Taliban gunmen 
Pakistani villagers stand around the grave for the Army Public School's principal, Mrs Kazi
Pakistani villagers stand around the grave for the Army Public School's principal, Mrs Kazi
People light candles to pay tribute to students of the Army Public School
People light candles to pay tribute to students of the Army Public School
Poignant: A group photograph of  Army Public School students
Poignant: A group photograph of Army Public School students
Pakistani women in Peshawar hold flowers to pay tribute to Army Public School students
Pakistani women in Peshawar hold flowers to pay tribute to Army Public School students
Candles are lit in Karachi for victims of the attack as the country tries to come to terms with what happened
Candles are lit in Karachi for victims of the attack as the country tries to come to terms with what happened
A member of a civil society group in Peshawar holds an anti-Taliban placard to condemn the attack
A member of a civil society group in Peshawar holds an anti-Taliban placard to condemn the attack
Protesters in Islamabad display their anger at the Taliban for the attack on the children
Protesters in Islamabad display their anger at the Taliban for the attack on the children
Heartbreaking: Photographs of some of the students massacred by  Taliban gunmen
Heartbreaking: Photographs of some of the students massacred by Taliban gunmen
The attack drew swift condemnation from around the world. President Barack Obama said the 'terrorists have once again showed their depravity.'
Pakistan's teenage Nobel Peace laureate Malala Yousafzai - herself a survivor of a Taliban shooting - said she was 'heartbroken' by the bloodshed.
Even Taliban militants in neighboring Afghanistan decried the killing spree, calling it 'un-Islamic.'
Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif pledged to step up the campaign that - along with U.S. drone strikes - has targeted the militants.
'We will take account of each and every drop of our children's blood,' said Sharif, who rushed to Peshawar shortly after the attack to offer support for the victims.
At a top-level meeting in Peshawar he said: 'We must not forget these scenes. The way they left bullet holes in the bodies of innocent kids, the way they tore apart their faces with bullets.'
Sharif said he spoke to Afghan President Ashraf Ghani late Tuesday to discuss how both countries could do more to fight terrorism. The two agreed to launch fresh operations on their respective sides of the border, he said, and pledged to 'clean this region from terrorism.' 
In neighboring India, which has long accused Pakistan of supporting anti-India guerrillas, schools on Wednesday observed two minutes of silence for the Peshawar victims at the urging of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who called the attack 'a senseless act of unspeakable brutality.'
Ziauddin Yousafzai, Pakistani diplomat and the father of Malala Yousafzai, told the BBC Today programme that his family was traumatised by the atrocity.
He said: 'Yesterday we heard about this horrible news, my whole family was in trauma. It is the extreme of extremism.
'I can imagine how much sadness, terror and horror those families will be passing through now.
'Yesterday my wife had a fit, she went into unconsciousness for five to 10 minutes. I have never seen my daughter so sad and upset as I saw her yesterday. 
'Schools should be safe places for children. I am afraid that if they [Taliban] are not countered, we may see more horrible things in future.'